Tuesday, April 5, 2016

D is for Daffodil

  

D is for Daffodil

I love the appearance of daffodils in the spring. They show up just after the crocus and are a sign that spring is really here. These signs of spring are quite common and are naturalized in many areas as well as being parts of formal and home gardens. They are native to the Mediterranean area and were originally grown by Roman and Greeks. At some point they were no longer cultivated and became wild until the early 1600's when the English decided to grow them. The early settlers brought them to the Americas. And the rest is history, as they say.

The name daffodil is often used interchangeably with jonquils and narcissus. Some will say that there are differences based on the specific kind of flower and those terms shouldn't be lumped together. Others say, that they are basically all the same thing. As for me, I don't quite understand the differences that are brought up, so I call them all daffodils. My differences are based on color and shape--such as a big yellow one or a small white one with an orange center.

Daffodils are grown in many cultures and each one has a symbolism based on them. There are variances on this, but most of the symbolism has the theme of rebirth. For me they symbolize hope--hope that there is really one flower that the squirrels and deer won't eat. This may be because the daffodil is a poisonous plant.

Daffodils are in full bloom in my neighborhood right now. However, my yard is a little behind my neighbors. While some are blooming, I have at least two varieties that haven't show a bud yet.

Are you enjoying daffodils this spring?

Spring welcoming Daffodils in my yard.























More Info.

http://www.thepoisongarden.co.uk/atoz/narcissus.htm

http://www.flowermeaning.com/daffodil-flower-meaning/


24 comments:

  1. Your pictures are beautiful. We've got daffodils out. I got to see a lot in Central Park last week. I'm concerned last night's freeze wasn't very good for them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We had a freeze last night also, but most of the daffodils seemed to have survived. I hope Central Park was as lucky.

      Delete
  2. I grew up calling them narcissus if they grew indoors (like Paperwhites), and daffodils if they grew outdoors. I love the white ones with the pale yellow inner cup, like in your bottom photo. The variety I have like that, here, is called Ice Follies. It's my fave, but doesn't do as well as the giant trumpet yellow ones. Do you have a preference on coloration in the daffodils?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I looked up ice follies and they seem like a classic that I really like. However, out of the 7 or 8 varieties I have, I don't think I have any like that. But I never remember from year to year exactly what there is. I don't really have one favorite, but I tend to lean towards ones that have a difference in color between the petals and the cup.

      Delete
  3. What beautiful flowers! Our daffodils are just a remembrance now, but they will return again next year and I will love them again. Right now I have azaleas in full bloom and the knock out roses are going nuts, along with a pot of petunias that managed to over winter and are blooming much better than they did all summer. No accounting for total neglect is there?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Our azaleas are budding and some of them should start blooming soon. I've thought about getting some knockout roses. How do you like them and do they need a lot of sunlight?

      Delete
    2. I love them in the yard but they are not cutting flowers. The actual rose is a little lackluster on its own but magnificent in mass on the bush. Ours get full sunlight but I have seen them thrive in partial shade. They require such little care, just an occasional whack to keep them from getting too big and leggy. I will probably fertilize them this year but I only do it every other year. They do require watering during periods of no rain but nothing like daily water. Since I am mainly a plant killer and they are thriving they get high survival marks.

      Delete
    3. A few years ago, I looked into getting some, but decided against it. I didn't remember why until you comment. Most of my flower beds have transitioned in to shade/partial shade over time with tree growth. I think they do better in full sun. I'm going to try to find a spot for some. I too need minimal care flowers.

      Delete
  4. They are so bright and cheery and welcome after a dreary winter. I can't think of anything that says spring or hope more than daffodils blooming.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I always get dandelion and daffodil mixed up, narcissus or jonquils, but that's good to know! Thanks :)

    I much prefer tulips and always looks for tulips when I see daffodils since they often bloom together, sort of like "where there's smoke, there's fire" except "where there's daffodils, there's tulips." ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. HBF, I replied to your comment, but who knows where it went. Let's try again.
      I like your turn on a phrase of "where's there's daffodils, there's tulips." Unfortunately, we don't have tulips anymore. The deer like them more than we do apparently.

      Delete
  6. I had no idea they were poisonous! Great post!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. While the whole plant is poisonous, the bulb is the most poisonous part. It probably won't kill you, but will make you pretty sick. Apparently there have been people who have mistaken daffodil bulbs for onions and gotten in trouble that way.

      Delete
  7. I had no idea they were poisonous! Great post!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I love all the spring flowering bulbs, but I have a special soft spot for daffodils. The yellow color reminds me of sunshine, something which can be lacking in the mid-west at this time of year! Daffodils take a lot more neglect than tulips--I love those, too, but tulips are harder for me to grow.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If I had thought about it, I should have added your favorite poem about daffodils to this post. It expresses beautifully what most people feel.

      Delete
  9. Awww... they're so purdy! Thanks for the tip on them being poisonous. I don't generally bring flowers inside because Smoky will try to eat them, but I'll be extra sure not the bring in any daffodils now!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. While all of my cats may nibble on a plant, Leo is the one who will eat anything and then throw up. I don't know about him sometimes.

      Delete
  10. Replies
    1. Do you have many daffodils in Cajun country?

      Delete
  11. Oh, wow, they're so gorgeous! I've just gotten into gardening, and I love how optimistic daffodils look. They always seem to be smiling.

    http://www.alittleevil.net

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Another lost reply of mine. Oh, well, here it goes again.
      I never thought about daffodils looking optimistic, but I guess they do. They certainly make most people feel optimistic.

      Delete
  12. No I haven't been enjoying spring so far, it's just too cold. But on the few nice days I did head out and was pleased to find daffodils blooming at two different homes. Daffodils are on my list to plant here because they are the only ones the deer seem to know to leave be.

    ReplyDelete

What do you think?